2010年4月30日金曜日

【 Joseph S. Nye 】 : Belfer Center Home

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Joseph S. Nye

Mailing address

Taubman 162
Visions of Governance in the 21st Century Project
79 John F. Kennedy St.
Cambridge, MA, 02138

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

Experience
Joseph S. Nye, Jr. is Dean Emeritus of the Kennedy School, Sultan of Oman Professor of International Relations, and a member of the Belfer Center Board of Directors. He joined the Harvard Faculty in 1964 and has served as Director of the Center for International Affairs, Dillon Professor of International Affairs, and Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. From 1977 to 1979 he served as Deputy to the Undersecretary of State for Security Assistance, Science and Technology and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In 1993 and 1994 he was chairman of the National Intelligence Council, which coordinates intelligence estimates for the President. In 1994 and 1995 he served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. In all three agencies, he received distinguished service awards.
Dr. Nye is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Diplomacy and a member of the Executive Committee on the Trilateral Commission. He has served as Director of the Aspen Strategy Group, Director of the Institute for East-West Security Studies, Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, the American representative on the United Nations Advisory Committee on Disarmament Affairs, and a member of the Advisory Committee of the Institute of International Economics. Dr. Nye received his bachelor's degree summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1958. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. In addition to teaching at Harvard, Dr. Nye has also taught for brief periods in Geneva, Ottawa, and London. He has lived for extended periods in Europe, East Africa, and Central America.

By Date
 

2010


AP Photo
April 11, 2010

"Health of American Politics"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Power conversion — translating power resources into effective influence — is a long-standing problem for the U.S. The Constitution is based on an 18th-century liberal view that power is best controlled by fragmentation and countervailing checks and balances."


AP Photo
March 11, 2010

"China's Bad Bet Against America"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[T]he fact that China holds so many dollars is not a true source of power, because the interdependence in the economic relationship is symmetrical. True, if China dumped its dollars on world markets, it could bring the American economy to its knees, but in doing so it would bring itself to its ankles. China would not only lose the value of its dollar reserves, but would suffer major unemployment. When interdependence is balanced, it does not constitute a source of power."


AP Photo
March 4, 2010

"Restoring America's Reputation in the World and Why It Matters"

Testimony
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[M]ilitary analysts trying to understand counter-insurgency have rediscovered the importance of struggles over soft power. In the words of General David Patreus, "we did reaffirm in Iraq the recognition that you don't kill or capture your way out of an industrial-strength insurgency." More recently he warned against expedient measures that damage our reputation. "We end us paying a price for it ultimately. Abu Ghraib and other situations like that are non-biodegradable. They don't go away. The enemy continues to beat you with them like a stick."  In Afghanistan, the Taliban have embarked on a sophisticated information war, using modern media tools as well as some old-fashioned one, to soften their image and win favor with local Afghans as they try to counter the Americans' new campaign to win Afghan hearts and minds.


AP Photo
February 15, 2010

"Smart Power Needs Smart Public Diplomacy"

Op-Ed, Daily Star
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[E]ven the best advertising cannot sell an unpopular product. A communications strategy cannot work if it cuts against the grain of policy. Actions speak louder than words. All too often, policymakers treat public diplomacy as a bandage that can be applied after damage is done by other instruments. For example, China tried to enhance its soft power by successfully staging the 2008 Olympics, but its simultaneous domestic crackdown in Tibet — and subsequent repression in Xinxiang and arrests of human rights lawyers — undercut its gains."


AP Photo
January 26, 2010

"Davos: What's the Point?"

Op-Ed, Washington Post
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"What good does it do? After attending nearly a score of annual meetings over the years, I have noticed that the conventional wisdom — whether gloom and doom or rise and shine — that summarizes each meeting often proves misleading. But to the extent that this little village in the Alps gets top leaders to raise their eyes above their inboxes and spend even a little time on global and humanitarian issues, it probably helps."


AP Photo
January 13, 2010

"Is Military Power Becoming Obsolete?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Armed groups view conflict as a continuum of political and violent irregular operations over a long period that will provide control over local populations. They benefit from the fact that scores of weak states lack the legitimacy or capacity to control their own territory effectively."


AP Photo
January 7, 2010

"An Alliance Larger Than One Issue"

Op-Ed, New York Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"This year is the 50th anniversary of the United States–Japan security treaty. The two countries will miss a major opportunity if they let the base controversy lead to bitter feelings or the further reduction of American forces in Japan. The best guarantee of security in a region where China remains a long-term challenge and a nuclear North Korea poses a clear threat remains the presence of American troops, which Japan helps to maintain with generous host nation support."

2009


AP Photo
December 15, 2009

"Testing Obama's Foreign Policy"

Op-Ed, Business Daily, (Africa)
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...critics on the left have complained that he has not been able to get Congress to pass a tough energy bill before the Copenhagen conference on climate change. But Obama has helped to persuade China and India to announce useful efforts, and he will set an American target of reducing greenhouse emissions that should prevent the conference from being a failure."


AP Photo
November 11, 2009

"South Korea's Growing Soft Power"

Op-Ed, Daily Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...South Korea has the resources to produce soft power, and its soft power is not prisoner to the geographical limitations that have constrained its hard power throughout its history. As a result, South Korea is beginning to design a foreign policy that will allow it to play a larger role in the international institutions and networks that will be essential to global governance."


AP Photo
November 9, 2009

"Who Caused the End of the Cold War?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Ultimately the deepest causes of Soviet collapse were the decline of communist ideology and the failure of the Soviet economy. This would have happened even without Gorbachev. In the early Cold War, communism and the Soviet Union had a good deal of soft power. Many communists had led the resistance against fascism in Europe, and many people believed that communism was the wave of the future....Although in theory communism aimed to instill a system of class justice, Lenin's heirs maintained domestic power through a brutal state security system involving lethal purges, gulags, broad censorship, and the use of informants. The net effect of these repressive measures was a general loss of faith in the system."


2010


AP Photo
April 11, 2010

"Health of American Politics"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Power conversion — translating power resources into effective influence — is a long-standing problem for the U.S. The Constitution is based on an 18th-century liberal view that power is best controlled by fragmentation and countervailing checks and balances."


AP Photo
March 11, 2010

"China's Bad Bet Against America"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[T]he fact that China holds so many dollars is not a true source of power, because the interdependence in the economic relationship is symmetrical. True, if China dumped its dollars on world markets, it could bring the American economy to its knees, but in doing so it would bring itself to its ankles. China would not only lose the value of its dollar reserves, but would suffer major unemployment. When interdependence is balanced, it does not constitute a source of power."


AP Photo
March 4, 2010

"Restoring America's Reputation in the World and Why It Matters"

Testimony
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[M]ilitary analysts trying to understand counter-insurgency have rediscovered the importance of struggles over soft power. In the words of General David Patreus, "we did reaffirm in Iraq the recognition that you don't kill or capture your way out of an industrial-strength insurgency." More recently he warned against expedient measures that damage our reputation. "We end us paying a price for it ultimately. Abu Ghraib and other situations like that are non-biodegradable. They don't go away. The enemy continues to beat you with them like a stick."  In Afghanistan, the Taliban have embarked on a sophisticated information war, using modern media tools as well as some old-fashioned one, to soften their image and win favor with local Afghans as they try to counter the Americans' new campaign to win Afghan hearts and minds.


AP Photo
February 15, 2010

"Smart Power Needs Smart Public Diplomacy"

Op-Ed, Daily Star
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...[E]ven the best advertising cannot sell an unpopular product. A communications strategy cannot work if it cuts against the grain of policy. Actions speak louder than words. All too often, policymakers treat public diplomacy as a bandage that can be applied after damage is done by other instruments. For example, China tried to enhance its soft power by successfully staging the 2008 Olympics, but its simultaneous domestic crackdown in Tibet — and subsequent repression in Xinxiang and arrests of human rights lawyers — undercut its gains."


AP Photo
January 26, 2010

"Davos: What's the Point?"

Op-Ed, Washington Post
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"What good does it do? After attending nearly a score of annual meetings over the years, I have noticed that the conventional wisdom — whether gloom and doom or rise and shine — that summarizes each meeting often proves misleading. But to the extent that this little village in the Alps gets top leaders to raise their eyes above their inboxes and spend even a little time on global and humanitarian issues, it probably helps."


AP Photo
January 13, 2010

"Is Military Power Becoming Obsolete?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Armed groups view conflict as a continuum of political and violent irregular operations over a long period that will provide control over local populations. They benefit from the fact that scores of weak states lack the legitimacy or capacity to control their own territory effectively."


AP Photo
January 7, 2010

"An Alliance Larger Than One Issue"

Op-Ed, New York Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"This year is the 50th anniversary of the United States–Japan security treaty. The two countries will miss a major opportunity if they let the base controversy lead to bitter feelings or the further reduction of American forces in Japan. The best guarantee of security in a region where China remains a long-term challenge and a nuclear North Korea poses a clear threat remains the presence of American troops, which Japan helps to maintain with generous host nation support."

2009


AP Photo
December 15, 2009

"Testing Obama's Foreign Policy"

Op-Ed, Business Daily, (Africa)
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...critics on the left have complained that he has not been able to get Congress to pass a tough energy bill before the Copenhagen conference on climate change. But Obama has helped to persuade China and India to announce useful efforts, and he will set an American target of reducing greenhouse emissions that should prevent the conference from being a failure."


AP Photo
November 11, 2009

"South Korea's Growing Soft Power"

Op-Ed, Daily Times
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"...South Korea has the resources to produce soft power, and its soft power is not prisoner to the geographical limitations that have constrained its hard power throughout its history. As a result, South Korea is beginning to design a foreign policy that will allow it to play a larger role in the international institutions and networks that will be essential to global governance."


AP Photo
November 9, 2009

"Who Caused the End of the Cold War?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post
By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor
"Ultimately the deepest causes of Soviet collapse were the decline of communist ideology and the failure of the Soviet economy. This would have happened even without Gorbachev. In the early Cold War, communism and the Soviet Union had a good deal of soft power. Many communists had led the resistance against fascism in Europe, and many people believed that communism was the wave of the future....Although in theory communism aimed to instill a system of class justice, Lenin's heirs maintained domestic power through a brutal state security system involving lethal purges, gulags, broad censorship, and the use of informants. The net effect of these repressive measures was a general loss of faith in the system."




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